Bringing Medical Records During Patient Consultation to a Physician

ROJOSON’S ADVICE TO ALL PATIENTS GOING FOR A PATIENT CONSULTATION TO A PHYSICIAN IS TO ALWAYS BRING ALL PAST MEDICAL RECORDS. 

To patients who will be consulting a new physician, always bring all past medical records. 

Advantages:

One, the new physician will always ask for them as these facilitate his task of diagnosis and treatment.  Two, the patient will avoid a second trip back to the physician just because he has to bring back past medical records. Most of the time, this will cost the patient a second-consultation bill. Third, the past medical records may prevent the physician from prescribing more diagnostic tests or repeating some tests.

To patients who will be consulting back to a previously seen physician, again, always bring all past medical records.  

Advantages:

One, the physician may need to review the past medical records.  Two, the physician may have lost his clinic records.

To all patients with past medical records, when making a patient consultation, make sure they are complete as they facilitate the physicians in their medical management.

A special note of advice to all patients who have undergone excision of a breast mass or any surface mass.  

A lot of times, when asked what was removed, what was the biopsy result, what was the histopath result, commonly encountered answers are “I don’t know;” “I was told it was benign;” and “No biopsy was done but the surgeon says it was benign.”   A conscientious surgeon will be disappointed to hear such answers.

My advices:

Even if there is no need for biopsy  or no biopsy was done on the mass, always ask the surgeon to write on a piece of paper or better a certification containing the diagnosis or name of the mass removed.  Then, keep this record for future reference or use.

Particularly important in breast operations, ask for a biopsy report or at least a certification on the name of breast tissue removed, if a biopsy is not done, even if it said to be benign.  A “benign” statement by the surgeon or the patient is non-specific.  It may be a fibroadenoma or a fibrocystic changes or other non-cancerous entity.  Knowing exactly what was removed before may help the subsequent surgeon manage the patient properly. Example, if the previous operation reveals fibrocystic changes, the current breast condition may also be fibrocystic changes.  In which case, the subsequent surgeon who believes that fibrocystic changes strictly speaking does not need treatment and  more so, surgical treatment,  will tend to advise the patient to just monitor and have regular check-up.

To repeat:

Even if there is no need for biopsy  or no biopsy was done on the mass, always ask the surgeon to write on a piece of paper or better a certification containing the diagnosis or name of the mass removed.  Then, keep this record for future reference or use.

ROJ-TPOR@16sept22

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